Mathematica - API Bindings

The Mathematica bindings allow you to control Bricks and Bricklets from your Mathematica notebooks. The ZIP file for the bindings contains:

  • Tinkerforge.dll, a precompiled .NET library
  • in source/ the source code of Tinkerforge.dll
  • in examples/ the examples for every Brick and Bricklet

The Mathematica bindings are based on the C# bindings. Since version 2.0.0 the C# bindings are CLS compliant. This allows to use them with all .NET compatible languages, such as Mathematica's .NET/Link support. It requires the .NET Framework on Windows and the Mono Framework on Linux and Mac OS X.

Requirements

  • Mathematica 5.0 or newer on Windows, Linux or Mac OS X with .NET/Link support

Installation

The installation of the Mathematica bindings is optional. You can install them as Mathematica AddOn or as Mathematica SystemFile, but you can also use them without installing them first.

As AddOn

To install the bindings as AddOn just create a new folder for Tinkerforge in the Mathematica AddOn-Applications folder and copy the Tinkerforge.dll file to it. On Windows the AddOn-Applications folder for Mathematica 9 is located here (for Mathematica 10 replace 9.0 by 10.0):

C:\Program Files\Wolfram Research\Mathematica\9.0\AddOns\Applications\

On Linux it's located here (for Mathematica 10 replace 9.0 by 10.0):

/usr/local/Wolfram/Mathematica/9.0/AddOns/Applications/

And on Mac OS X it's located here:

/Applications/Mathematica.app/AddOns/Applications/

Create a Tinkerforge/ folder here, create an assembly/ folder in copy the Tinkerforge.dll file to it. Afterwards it should look like this on Windows:

C:\Program Files\Wolfram Research\Mathematica\9.0\AddOns\Applications\Tinkerforge\assembly\Tinkerforge.dll

Like this on Linux:

/usr/local/Wolfram/Mathematica/9.0/AddOns/Applications/Tinkerforge/assembly/Tinkerforge.dll

And like this on Mac OS X:

/Applications/Mathematica.app/AddOns/Applications/Tinkerforge/assembly/Tinkerforge.dll

If you installed the bindings like this then you have to modify the LoadNETAssembly[] call in the examples like this:

LoadNETAssembly["Tinkerforge","Tinkerforge`"]

The section about testing an example has more details about this.

As SystemFile

To install the bindings as Systemfile copy the Tinkerforge.dll file to Mathematica's SystemFiles folder for .NET/Link. On Windows the SystemFiles folder for .NET/Link for Mathematica 9 is located here (for Mathematica 10 replace 9.0 by 10.0):

C:\Program Files\Wolfram Research\Mathematica\9.0\SystemFiles\Links\NETLink\

On Linux it's located here (for Mathematica 10 replace 9.0 by 10.0):

/usr/local/Wolfram/Mathematica/9.0/SystemFiles/Links/NETLink/

And on Mac OS X it's located here:

/Applications/Mathematica.app/SystemFiles/Links/NETLink/

If you installed the bindings like this then you have to modify the LoadNETAssembly[] call in the examples like this:

LoadNETAssembly["Tinkerforge"]

The section about testing an example has more details about this.

Without Installation

You can use the Mathematica bindings without having to install them. Just give the folder that contains the Tinkerforge.dll file as parameter to the LoadNETAssembly[] call. The examples are set up in a ways that the LoadNETAssembly[] call already points correctly to the Tinkerforge.dll file if the bindings and the examples have been unpacked from the ZIP file. The section about testing an example has more details about this.

Testing an Example

To test a Mathematica example Brick Daemon and Brick Viewer have to be installed first. Brick Daemon acts as a proxy between the USB interface of the Bricks and the API bindings. Brick Viewer connects to Brick Daemon and helps to figure out basic information about the connected Bricks and Bricklets.

Stepper Brick

As an example we will run the Stepper Brick configuration example. To do this open the ExampleConfiguration.nb Notebook from the examples/Brick/Stepper/ folder in Mathematica.

Loading the Bindings

Depending on if and how you installed the Mathematica bindings you have to adapt the LoadNETAssembly[] call accordingly to make Mathematica find the Tinkerforge.dll file. Further details about handling .NET libraries in Mathematica documentation.

If the bindings are installed as AddOn then the LoadNETAssembly[] call has to look like this:

LoadNETAssembly["Tinkerforge","Tinkerforge`"]

If the bindings are installed as SystemFile then the LoadNETAssembly[] call has to look like this:

LoadNETAssembly["Tinkerforge"]

If you did not install the bindings then the LoadNETAssembly[] call can stay as it is, if you run the examples from the unpacked ZIP file for the bindings. The examples are set up in a ways that the LoadNETAssembly[] call already points correctly to the Tinkerforge.dll file if the bindings and the examples have been unpacked from the ZIP file.

You can also call LoadNETAssembly[] with an absolute path to the Tinkerforge.dll file. For example like this on Windows:

LoadNETAssembly["C:\\Absolute\\path\\to\\Tinkerforge.dll"]

Or like this on Linux and Mac OS X:

LoadNETAssembly["/Absolute/path/to/Tinkerforge.dll"]

Configure Network Address and UID

In the example host and port specify at which network address the Stepper Brick can be found. If it is connected locally to USB then localhost and 4223 is correct. The uid value has to be changed to the UID of the connected Stepper Brick, which you can figure out using Brick Viewer:

host="localhost"
port=4223
uid="XYZ"(* Change to your UID *)

Now you're ready to test this example. Evaluate all cells in top-down order to do this.

Temperature Bricklet

Here's an another example showing a dynamic plot of Temperature Bricklet measurements. The drop at sample 82 was created using a freezer spray.

Temprature Bricklet dynamic plot example

API Reference and Examples

Links to the API reference for the IP Connection, Bricks and Bricklets as well as the examples from the ZIP file of the bindings are listed in the following table. Further project descriptions can be found in the Starter Kits section.

  API Examples
IP Connection API Examples
     
Bricks    
DC API Examples
IMU API Examples
IMU 2.0 API Examples
Master API Examples
RED API Examples
Servo API Examples
Stepper API Examples
     
Bricklets    
Accelerometer API Examples
Ambient Light API Examples
Ambient Light 2.0 API Examples
Analog In API Examples
Analog In 2.0 API Examples
Analog Out API Examples
Analog Out 2.0 API Examples
Barometer API Examples
CAN API Examples
CO2 API Examples
Color API Examples
Current12 API Examples
Current25 API Examples
Distance IR API Examples
Distance US API Examples
Dual Button API Examples
Dual Relay API Examples
Dust Detector API Examples
GPS API Examples
Hall Effect API Examples
Humidity API Examples
Industrial Analog Out API Examples
Industrial Digital In 4 API Examples
Industrial Digital Out 4 API Examples
Industrial Dual 0-20mA API Examples
Industrial Dual Analog In API Examples
Industrial Quad Relay API Examples
IO-16 API Examples
IO-4 API Examples
Joystick API Examples
Laser Range Finder API Examples
LCD 16x2 API Examples
LCD 20x4 API Examples
LED Strip API Examples
Line API Examples
Linear Poti API Examples
Load Cell API Examples
Moisture API Examples
Motion Detector API Examples
Multi Touch API Examples
NFC/RFID API Examples
OLED 128x64 API Examples
OLED 64x48 API Examples
Piezo Buzzer API Examples
Piezo Speaker API Examples
PTC API Examples
Real-Time Clock API Examples
Remote Switch API Examples
RGB LED API Examples
Rotary Encoder API Examples
Rotary Poti API Examples
RS232 API Examples
Segment Display 4x7 API Examples
Solid State Relay API Examples
Sound Intensity API Examples
Temperature API Examples
Temperature IR API Examples
Thermocouple API Examples
Tilt API Examples
UV Light API Examples
Voltage API Examples
Voltage/Current API Examples